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Facebook CEO Zuckerberg calls on the government to introduce more Internet regulatory measures

According to the American Overseas Chinese News Network, few CEOs will ask the government to increase supervision, but Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges that the social media giant may need more regulation.

According to reports, Zuckerberg published a new article in the Washington Post on March 30, publicly lobbying the government to supervise four areas.

“I think we need governments and regulators to play a more active role,” Zuckerberg wrote. “By updating the Internet rules, we can preserve the best side of the Internet – people express their freedom, and entrepreneurs create new The freedom of things - while protecting society from the wider harm."




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The world should develop new Internet regulations to protect society from harmful content, safeguard the fairness of elections, protect people's privacy, and ensure data portability.

Zuckerberg mentioned that if the company itself monitors Internet content, the responsibility and burden are too great, and governments and regulators should also participate.

He said that although Internet companies have an unshirkable responsibility for eliminating harmful content, when people use dozens of different shared services, it is impossible to delete all harmful information on the Internet because these services have Their own policies and processes, so there is a need for a more standardized approach.

Zuckerberg also cited judgments about political advertising. He pointed out that despite Facebook's efforts, it is difficult to determine when an ad should be considered a political ad. And if the regulator can set a uniform standard for verifying political behavior, the system for reviewing content will be more effective.


In addition, the billionaire has called for supervision, and the management department should ensure data portability and ensure that users can transfer data between various network services. He claims that this is important for the Internet and for creating the services people want. But this needs to be clearly defined, who should be responsible for protecting information as it flows between services:



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“I believe that if more countries adopt regulatory requirements such as the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) as a common framework, this will benefit the Internet.”

Since the December 2015 issue of The Guardian reported that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy, has collected data from tens of millions of users, the US government has already published Facebook with 1.52 billion daily users. An increasingly strict review.

The scandal reveals how much information social media companies and applications can get when they sign up.

In the article, Zuckerberg outlines four areas where new regulations are needed: harmful content, election integrity, privacy, and data portability. “Members often tell me that we have too much power over speech, and frankly, I agree with this,” he wrote.




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Zuckerberg said he is creating an "independent body" that allows people to appeal against decisions about harmful content.

Earlier this month, a New Zealand man posted a direct attack on two mosques on Facebook, which killed 50 people.

Zuckerberg also called for new legislation to address the electoral issue: "If regulators develop common standards for verifying political actors, our system will be more effective." Zuckerberg said he believes "a common global framework." "It will help protect people's privacy on social media and point out that the EU's overall data protection regulations are a framework.

For years, people have claimed that Facebook and other social media companies need self-regulation. In the past few years, Facebook has implemented a series of regulations on itself, including reviewing advertisements and requiring political advertisements to disclose paying users.

But Zuckerberg admitted in a congressional hearing in April 2018 that he did not completely oppose government regulation, he just wanted correct supervision.